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 PanaFlow Sandwich
PanaFlow Sandwich
By: Sverre Sjøthun, March 7, 2000  Print this article

I have, as many of you out there, been wondering how the PanaFlow could possibly fit a Celeron. I happened to get my hands on one of these babies, and decided to find out.

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I have, as many of you out there, been wondering how the PanaFlow could possibly fit a Celeron. I happened to get my hands on one of these babies, and decided to find out.

Christer, one of my friends have a Celeron 400 with stock cooling and a generic slotket, and we wanted to see how high this CPU could go. At first we tried it out with the 3dfxCool’s Big MoFoHo-REX (Same as I used in my setup with the celery466@602). We found out that his CPU was a tough little bastard, wouldn’t even run at 600 with core-voltage at 2,2. So we decided to try it with the PanaFlow and a spare TEC I happen to have laying around.

I went over to the metal-store and got two rectangular aluminum-sheets: 135x85mm, 2mm thick. When I came home, I measured up where to put the bolts to fasten the plates and drilled the holes. On the PanaFlow there are already four holes in the base of the heatsink, so all I had do here was to measure up where to make holes on the hotplate. This part took some time, but with some degree of accuracy it’s not that tricky.

Next up is the insulation. In both this setup and the upcoming water-cooler, I use some stuff I found in a store selling air-conditioner equipment. It’s called Aeroflex and is very easy to cut and form. I cut the frame that goes around the peltier, the backside insulation of the CPU and a small piece to put inside the socket to prevent condensation on the bottom of the CPU.

Fig. 1 Showing you the cross section of the whole sandwich.

Fig. 1 Showing you the cross section of the whole sandwich.


As it turned out the motherboard (Asus-something) had some capacitors that was (of course, that’s just my luck) blocking for the plate on the back so that I had a real hard time making the sandwich fit into the socket. After carefully bending them backwards it finally went in, so before you do the same I suggest you check that first.

Fig. 2 Materials used.

Fig. 2 Materials used.


Fig. 3 The finished sandwich.

Fig. 3 The finished sandwich.


Fig. 4 The sandwich mounted.

Fig. 4 The sandwich mounted.


Now it’s time to see what his CPU is good for. Started straight on at 600MHz. BINGO!! Booted at 600 with the core at 2,0V. CPU-temp unknown because his board didn’t have any probes. My guess is about 15-20C at idle.

As far as I know, it’s running rock-stable at this speed, and that’s pretty impressive taken into consideration that it wouldn’t even start Windows with neither the stock cooler nor the BIG MoFoHo-REX.

I am really satisfied with this setup, and I hope you find this short note informative and inspiring as well. If you still have any questions, send me an e-mail and I’ll try to clear things up.

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