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 Unlocking the Multiplier on Intel Processors
Starting the procedure
By: Sverre Sjøthun, February 18, 2002  Print this article

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Onwards to the procedure, here are the tools used -- a hammer, two screwdrivers, a scalpell and a wrench. Also make sure to ESD secure your desk. ESD, or Electro Static Discharge, is very harmful to electronic equipment, and processors are especially susceptible to ESD because of the microscale circuitry within the processor. One very easy way to ESD proof your desk or work area is to hook one end of a cord to the ground on your power outlet and the other end around your wrist.

Fig. 1 The tools used:  a hammer, two screwdrivers, a scalpell and a wrench.

Fig. 1 The tools used: a hammer, two screwdrivers, a scalpell and a wrench.


First step to a sucessful removement of the multiplier is to pop off the "slug" that covers the actual processor core. Put the processor flat on your desk and gently start hammering away the slug. We used a hammer and a screwdriver, but a chisel will do just fine.

Fig. 2 Removing the slug on the processor.

Fig. 2 Removing the slug on the processor.


After popping off the slug on our trusty old PII266, we can see directly on the processor core consisting of silisium and, in this case, aluminum interconnects. The PII266 was designed before the Dual Damascene technique was implemented, although IBM actually managed to manufacture processors with copper interconnects utilizing the Dual Damascene technique as early as -88. For those of you that are interested in the making and story behind the new copper interconnect processors, I recommend that you read The Copper Story, The Story Behind the Copper Processors here on this site.

Fig. 3 The processor with the slug removed. Notice the instructions on the core.

Fig. 3 The processor with the slug removed. Notice the instructions on the core.


An important issue when it comes to overclocking is production of heat, or rather getting rid of the heat. This may come as a surprise to many of you out there, but Intel have actually put a heating element inside their processors. I believe this applies to AMD as well, and I suspect that the heating element was placed in the processors core due to an alliance between the microprocessor manufacturers and cooling equipment suppliers. The result is that the consumer have to spend huge ammounts of money buying cooling equipment you don't really need. By having a look at the bare core, you can read that it actually have instructions to disable this heating element. All you have to do is to press AltGr+F5 and you're done.

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  Introduction
  Starting the procedure
  Proceeding removing the lock
  Tweaking the cache
  Burning in the processor
  Conclusion


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